Peter Smith

peter smithManaging Director, Spend Matters

Peter has over 25 years experience in procurement and supply chain as a manager, procurement director, consultant, analyst and writer. He edits Spend Matters UK / Europe, and with Jason Busch, the founder of Spend Matters in the US, has developed it into a leading web-based resource for procurement and industry professionals. Peter is also Managing Director of Procurement Excellence Ltd, a leading specialist consulting firm, and is recognised as one of the UK’s leading experts in public and private sector procurement performance improvement.   Peter has an MA in Mathematics from Cambridge University, is a Fellow and was 2003 President of the Chartered Institute of Purchasing and Supply, and his first (co-authored) book, “Buying Professional Services”, was published by the Economist Books in June 2010.  Before moving into consultancy, he was Procurement Director for the NatWest Group, the Department of Social Security (the DSS), and the Dun & Bradstreet Corporation, and held senior positions in the Mars Group.

 

Session Details

Can Procurement Be A Force For Good?

Peter Smith will look at how procurement is increasingly expected to do more than “just” keep the organisation supplied with the goods and services it needs while achieving reasonable value for money. The whole spectrum of corporate social responsibility seems to grow year by year, and procurement is being positioned as having a key role in everything from the fight against modern slavery to improving privacy and data security and helping social enterprises! Is this wider and complex set of expectations reasonable for the profession? And are there both good examples of success and perhaps some cautionary tales too that we can learn from?

Benefits of attending this session:
> Discover some of the ‘non-traditional’ ways in which procurement can make a difference, add value and be a force for change.
> Be involved in some thought-provoking discussion about what procurement is currently doing in this area and how it can do more – or maybe even less!
> Understand how you can actually be that force for change, without doing too much and getting totally overloaded.